News Archive

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Jun 2019: NGTS-7Ab is an ultra-short period transiting brown dwarf. The orbital period is only 16 hours, and the stars are so close that the brown dwarf has tidally spun-up its young M dwarf host star. Magnetic braking should be decaying the orbit, meaning the stars are likely to merge within a few million years. Read the full paper on arXiv.
May 2019: NGTS discovery of the 'Forbidden Planet' in the Neptunian Desert. NGTS-4b is sub-Neptune sized planet only three times the size of the Earth. The transit is by far the shallowest ever discovered from the ground, only 0.13% deep. The planet is situated very close to it K-type host star, in a region where Neptune-sized planets are thought to be photoevaporated by the high-energy emission of the star. Read the Warwick Press Release and the full journal article. Image credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick.
Apr 2019: Giant flare detected from coolest star seen to exhbit a white-light flare. The star has a temperature of only 2000K (an L2.5 dwarf) and it is only a tenth the size of the Sun. During the flare it suddenly became ten thousand times brighter than normal, with an energy ten times greater than the largest flare ever seen on the Sun. Read the Warwick Press Release and the full journal article.
Nov 2018: First NGTS public data release (NGTS DR1). The data release includes 32 billion photometric measurements of more than two hundred thousand stars. It is a total of 1.7 TB of data. Read the ESO Announcement including the release notes.
Oct 2017: NGTS has found its first planet, and its a Monster! NGTS-1b is a rare Jupiter-sized exoplanet found orbiting a small M-dwarf host star. The red sensitivity and high precision of the NGTS telescopes enabled this doscovery, which challenges theories of planet formation that link the maximum mass of a planet with the mass its host star and its associated protoplanetary disc. Read the Warwick Press Release and the full journal article. Image credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick.
Apr 2016: NGTS Exoplanet survey begins. Commissioning of the NGTS facility is complete and routine survey observations began this month. Image credit: G. Lambert.
Jan 2015: First light at Paranal!
Read the ESO Press Release
including some fantastic pictures, videos and an ESO Podcast. Image credit: G. Lambert.
Feb 2014: Construction of NGTS begins at Paranal. Construction began in January, with the concrete base and telescope piers completed in February. The control room/container building can be seen to the right, with the ESO Very Large Telescope in the background. Image credit: G. Lambert.